Yukon wild

Yukon wild
Yukon wild

Friday, November 9, 2012

Quilting Photo a Day November 3rd–Rolled Up

The hay is all rolled up for the winter.  Different people do it differently and I’m not sure why.  There is a lot to learn in farming world.

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I don’t take pictures of my quilts rolled up very often but here is one of the quilt we made for our friend who went out for cancer treatment.

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Janet

4 comments:

  1. well .. you can make a (I hope the word is right) sort of mini-silage if you wrap those rolls in that white foil, you can make those huge round things and then you can just "unroll" them in the stable for the cattle to eat ... ehh you can make small squares (sadly up to 20kg) you can use them for small size things, and you can move those around without heavy machinery hmmmm you can just leave it to dry on stakes, collect them later and add them to the upper hay-floor (older stuff get's thrown on the middle floor, from where it then can be thrown into the stable) -- I don't thinkt the last option gets used anymore ... anyway that are the experiences I had with hay ... ohh of course you can buy it packed in hmm 15 litre plastic bags for your guinea pig (but I don't think that is in the same categorie) ...

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  2. When I was a child. ...Oh those many years ago..., my Dad and the neighbours had their hay bales made with a "Holland" baler, oblong bales, easy to handle, tied with green baling twine, no plastic to get rid of, no special trailer to use, but these days hay in NZ is done in huge round bales, wrapped in green supposedly biodegradable plastic, but then you need a special trailer, fitted so the bales unroll. But when I was really young, in the 1940's, ( do not laugh too much!!) they did hay with what was called " Stack and grab" the horse pulled the pulley out from a triangle sort of pipes, bit like a wigwam frame, with hay loaded into the claws, at the top of the stack one man pulled the rope, the claws undid and the hay landed at the top. then the horse was led back in, and it was loaded all over again, a long slow day's work. Three farms shared one horse for this, I can remember where it was, before the hay barn was built.Hay was almost always finished before Christmas day. This is NZ, down under .Greetings from Jean

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  3. I don't know much about hay but that quilt is a nice roll! And your table is gorgeous....beautiful wood!

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  4. I kinda liked the old squared off bales that stacked so neatly in the hay loft and could be used to climb on and hide in and build play houses with.

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